TV or Not TV – The Question

I don’t ordinarily watch TV except to view the weather report.

The question is to watch TV or not watch TV during the the two weeks before the coming election.

Do any of us really want to have our ears and eyes assaulted with noxious negative campaign ads?

In an anti-Max Rose TV ad, a woman using the bleeped-out word motherf**ker protested how Rose turned his back on police officers. This made me only want to vote for Max Rose instead of Nicole Malliotakis.

The fact that most white people see nothing wrong with cops using chokeholds alarms me. Max Rose cosponsored a bill against the use of chokeholds.

Am I the only person who thinks there’s something wrong in America when Black individuals don’t have the freedom to walk down the street unharmed?

Max Rose is not the biggest clown that has emerged from the clown car of our elected leaders’ circus.

He represents parts of Brooklyn and Staten Island in the U.S. Congress. He is an Army veteran. In the campaign ads in which he talks to viewers he comes across (IMHO) as aggressive yet accomplished if you can believe his claims.

Max Rose wears a beige sweater in his TV ads.

His opponent Nicole Malliotakis has sunk to a new low by allowing a toilet-mouthed talking head to represent her in the TV ad. The woman shouting obscenities against Max Rose was openly against Black Lives Matter.

Is someone who calls a leader of our government a motherf**ker a credible character witness? People who live on Staten Island should be ashamed that this wonky woman represents them.

I was told Max Rose won the election the first time because he was military. He toppled decades of Republican rule in that district.

Ordinarily I have voted for the Green Party candidate.

Is this what America has come to—people with their hatred of social justice talking loud and proud invading my living room when I want to watch the weather report?

I’m terrified to turn on the TV.

I don’t want a gutter gal with delusions of grandeur parroting hate speech on my TV screen.

Sadly, a political committee pixilated with power could afford to buy air time.

Money equals might in America–and this is the ultimate injustice.

25 Years in Remission

This week I celebrate having been in remission from SZ for 25 years–out of the hospital and having had ZERO symptoms for 25 years.

In 1987 when I got out of the hospital the first time I went shopping at the local Macy’s in the Mall. There’s a grain of truth to the expression: “When the going gets tough, the tough go shopping.”

What I bought: a black suede zebra-print embossed pocketbook; a light gray sweatshirt with black tipping on the bottom, neckline, and sleeves; and an interesting sterling silver necklace that I’ve kept all these years.

Most of what I bought is gone yet won’t ever be forgotten, just like I remember nearly every significant item of clothing I bought and wore in the late 1980s and 1990s.

I think striving to be in remission is a noble goal to achieve. It certainly makes things easier when you’re not burdened with permanent symptoms the rest of your life.

Yet I will always stress this above all else: you can hold a job and be successful in life even though you might still have symptoms.

I know people who have jobs and still hear voices occasionally.

In my life I’m grateful to be in remission, a status I don’t take lightly.

I got here because I take a dose of medication, yet as a professional told me: “You recovered more so because of the actions you took.”

Which proves the premise of the Rachel Roy book I reviewed in the last blog entry.

Ten years ago when I first started blogging I wrote too:

“It’s not the enormity or severity of your challenge that determines your fate, but how you respond to it.”

So back then I had stated in my own words what Rachel Roy also told readers: the choice is yours how you want to live your life.

I chose in 2002 to become a mental health advocate.

Years later I consider myself simply to be an Activist because I’ve branched out into a focus on fitness, which encompasses fitness of mind, body, spirit, careers, finances, and relationships.

As well as  helping keep our planet fit and free from environmental destruction.

My goal is to be the change I want to see in the world.

To that end I’ve been focused on getting a second non-fiction book edited that I hope to publish within three years.

I hold this above all else to be true and will go to my grave championing this:

That getting the right treatment right away can enable you to have a better life.

It might include taking medication or it might not.

Yet when you’re in emotional pain, when you’re suffering from mental distress, you really shouldn’t wait it out and allow your hardship to progress so that it becomes a permanent disability.

If any of my readers fit this scenario, I urge you to get professional help right now.

Yes–I’ve been in remission for 25 years.

I hope to live at least 25 years more to continue to uplift and inspire everyone I meet.

My message is clear and simple:

Now more than ever it’s possible to have a full and robust life living in recovery–with or without symptoms.

A Sense of Place

I’m giving a talk on employment on Saturday, November 12 from 5:40 to 6:40 p.m. at the 2016 NAMI-New York State Educational Conference.

In employment as in housing environment makes all the difference. Finding the job you love is imperative. Finding a home to call your own is imperative too.

I’ll talk here about a sense of place. Living in a city or town you love makes all the difference. I’ve lived on Staten Island. I’ve lived in Brooklyn: boroughs of New York City.

I’m not a fan of moving into neighborhoods and gentrifying them. I’m proud that I wasn’t ever guilty of gentrifying a neighborhood.

Where you live and where you work can sustain you emotionally not just physically or financially. Making money by making art–what’s not to love if you’re a quirky or creative person?

Staten Island was all white all the time when I lived there years ago. It’s where a cop killed Eric Garner in a choke hold.

Sometimes where you start out in life is not where you have to remain. A lot of times you have to leave that place to have a better life.

Everyone needs to live and work in a place where they feel they belong.

I’ll be talking at the educational conference about how I coach peers and others in writing resumes and finding a suitable career.

The info about the conference will be posted on my website on the author appearance page so you can click on that link for more details.